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Posted January 12, 2017 by Paul Roux in SA Gamer Awards 2016
 
 

SA Gamer Awards 2016: Most Disappointing Game

most-disappointing

We’ve all been there, sometimes things just don’t live up to our expectations. You either get home with your fresh copy of a new video game or have your download complete and are now ready to be sucked into the incredible experience you’ve been waiting months, even years for. So you start out the game and probably get quite into it, but something just doesn’t feel right. You start to feel a bit of dread as you realise that what you’re playing just isn’t what you were hoping for. This is when the disappointment hits you and after all that anticipation you begin to realise you’ve spent your hard-earned money on something that has made you feel empty inside. We get to see examples of this every year, but which game of 2016 was the best reason to not pre-order games™?

No Man’s Sky

No Man's Sky_20160809215838
There were a lot of things to be disappointed about in 2016 but nothing could hold a candle to the debacle that was No Man’s Sky. After years of development and many a statement by The Murrayneux, No Man’s Sky released as nothing more than a shell of what was expected. The hype machine created its own beautiful monster and it blew up on itself gloriously, creating months of animosity between gamers and Hello Games, getting to the point where people thought they were just taking the money and running. Regardless of your thoughts on No Man’s Sky and the controversy surrounding it, it’s difficult to think of any other game in 2016 that caused as much disappointment and saw as much backlash after its release. While efforts are being made by Hello Games to bring No Man’s Sky up to what was expected, the damage has been done and there will always be a negative sentiment around the game. No Man’s Sky will always be known as the full-priced early access game that promised a universe but struggled to provide the stars.

Runner-Up: ReCore
Dishonourable Mention: Street Fighter V, Mirror’s Edge: Catalyst





Paul Roux