Health and Fitness

AdrianH

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As I am getting older, I am finding I can no longer eat the junk/unhealthy food I used to without putting on weight. This has only been an issue the last few years, even though my diet and activity has been the same for the last 15 odd years.

So back in April I was weighing 96KG, I was miserable, irritated and frustrated that I was weighing so much, and it just kept creeping on up. So I decided to take drastic action, started on the Keto diet mid-April and to date, I am 11KGs down to 85KG. My goal is 80KG so 5KG to go for this stretch.

Overall, the first few weeks were difficult as the cravings for junk food would constantly nag at me. Also, it was tough to learn what food I can and can't eat. For the first time I actually had to learn in more detail what different nutritional values on food actually do to the body. What is good about the diet is that I now plan and prepare what I will eat, even when snacking. Before I would grab anything in the cupboards or fridge that was convenient.

A few weeks ago we went to Tunisia for a weeks break and I decided I would break my diet while on holiday. During the time there, I pretty much ate what I wanted to, but I found I ate less than I used to months ago. I even ate some sweets during the day and pudding in the evening, ate carby foods as well. When I returned, I had only gained 0.5KGs. I am now back onto Keto and already lost the holiday weight I gained.

Keto diet is not for everyone, it takes a lot of discipline to stick to it, but if you really try, you can lose the KGs.
 
Good to hear you've had success with your weight-loss diet. Have you thought of what you want your diet to look like once you get to 80kg?

Regular exercise is also an important factor, especially weight training. Our metabolisms don't actually start to change until we reach our 60s, what does happen though is that from our 30s on we begin to lose muscle mass as sarcopenia sets in. How much muscle mass you have has a big effect on how much energy you burn - more muscle, more calories you can take in without gaining weight and the easier it is to lose weight.

It's a consistent theme, quality of life in general remains far higher for people who keep up a regular exercise routine, it massively impacts general health outcomes and all-cause mortality. Feeling tired and sore in your 40s and 50s is not a given, it's something we allow to set in through inactivity and dietary choices.

Having said all that, I appreciate it's very difficult to get into any kind of fitness routine when you're not used to doing much at all. For myself, I find it easier to stay motivated by being part of a class of some sort. It keeps you on a schedule and you get to know other regulars, which then becomes its own little support group.

I don't think there's a one size fits all motivational tip though. My wife for example prefers training alone, in the summer she goes out to the water with her mat and kettle bell and trains there.

Overall I just want to keep feeling good for as long as I can, 40 may seem old to some, but we've got a long way to go yet!
 
I am not one for much exercising. However last few months just incorporating and being conscious of basic activity has made a difference. Brisk walking daily (30min), squats, lunges, planking and 10 push ups in morning has made a difference to my energy levels during day.
No excessive snacking and drastically reduced junk food my biggest challenge. Also at that age where just eating slap chips or a burger has me feeling 'ugh' after.
 
I must say this is the one thing Covid has somewhat cocked up for me indirectly.

I’ve never been one for planned exercise, but riding motorcycle to work every day was enough to round it off where I didn’t feel unfit and weight was never really hard to manage and with the Crohn’s was intentionally kept a bit on the heavier side.

Now that I work from home most of the time however, the bike is seeing very little mileage and I’m the heaviest I’ve ever been but not drastically so as nobody else has even really noticed.

Actually the only reason I really know is that I’m snoring more extremely which is a problem for everyone else.

I’m annoyed though because the one thing that really worked well, Apple Fitness as it fit into my lifestyle very easily is such a pain to “make work” in SA that I stopped out of annoyance.
 
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Good to hear you've had success with your weight-loss diet. Have you thought of what you want your diet to look like once you get to 80kg?

Regular exercise is also an important factor, especially weight training. Our metabolisms don't actually start to change until we reach our 60s, what does happen though is that from our 30s on we begin to lose muscle mass as sarcopenia sets in. How much muscle mass you have has a big effect on how much energy you burn - more muscle, more calories you can take in without gaining weight and the easier it is to lose weight.

It's a consistent theme, quality of life in general remains far higher for people who keep up a regular exercise routine, it massively impacts general health outcomes and all-cause mortality. Feeling tired and sore in your 40s and 50s is not a given, it's something we allow to set in through inactivity and dietary choices.

Having said all that, I appreciate it's very difficult to get into any kind of fitness routine when you're not used to doing much at all. For myself, I find it easier to stay motivated by being part of a class of some sort. It keeps you on a schedule and you get to know other regulars, which then becomes its own little support group.

I don't think there's a one size fits all motivational tip though. My wife for example prefers training alone, in the summer she goes out to the water with her mat and kettle bell and trains there.

Overall I just want to keep feeling good for as long as I can, 40 may seem old to some, but we've got a long way to go yet!

I have thought about it, but only from a point of view I will need to deal with it when I reach the target weight. I have, and I am still putting it off.

Back in SA, I used to do the circuit training at the Virgin Active, I enjoyed that. For some strange reason, they don't seems to have circuit training at the two gyms I have been to here. What I might do though is twice a week, do some basic weight training at the gym, maybe even 30 minutes on the elliptical or treadmill, but I would rather go for walks when the weather permits for cardio.

As for diet, now that I have found I can survive without junk food, for the most part I can carry on with eating what I eat now, but allow myself to indulge periodically. Previously I could easily eat a large packet of crips in a single night, or half a slab of chocolate. We would have takeaways once or twice per week, and some of the food we cooked was very carb heavy. Going forward I will only buy small packets of crips, and chocolate I no longer really crave. Being on Keto mean I basically cut out all sugars, which includes milk chocolate. I am allowed very dark chocolate 85%+ cocoa, and I have a block or two every now and again. I think it will be trial and error to see how my body reacts to a less keto like diet, but I think with some basic exercise and being conscience of what I am eating, the weight should stay off and I will continue to feel better.

Of course, its always the wet and gloomy winters that tempt us the most. If I can get through the winter without faltering, then I think I will be ok.
 
I must day this is the one thing Covid has somewhat cocked up for me indirectly.

I’ve never been one for planned exercise, but riding motorcycle to work every day was enough to round it off where I didn’t feel unfit and weight was never really hard to manage and with the Crohn’s was intentionally kept a bit on the heavier side.

Now that I work from home most of the time however, the bike is seeing very little mileage and I’m the heaviest I’ve ever been but not drastically so as nobody else has even really noticed.

Actually the only reason I really know is that I’m snoring more extremely which is a problem for everyone else.

I’m annoyed though because the one thing that really worked well, Apple Fitness as it fit into my lifestyle very easily is such a pain to “make work” in SA that I stopped out of annoyance.

Working from home definitely contributed to my weight gain. It was too easy to walk to the kitchen and grab some crips or biscuits to snack on.

I after 5 years recently upgraded to a new phone, a Samsung S23 which includes Samsung Health. Via Vitality UK, I can get discounts on Samsung smart watches, so will likely upgrade from my Garmin to one of those to try assist with my day to day activity tracking.
 
Working from home definitely contributed to my weight gain. It was too easy to walk to the kitchen and grab some crips or biscuits to snack on.

I after 5 years recently upgraded to a new phone, a Samsung S23 which includes Samsung Health. Via Vitality UK, I can get discounts on Samsung smart watches, so will likely upgrade from my Garmin to one of those to try assist with my day to day activity tracking.
At least one thing I've managed which wasn't possible all my life is NOT having breakfast first thing purely because I'm not going anywhere.

So I tend to stretch that as far as I can and only coffee and then have an early lunch and push through to dinner.

The moment I go to the office or anywhere else though there is no way I can't have breakfast.
 
I gained a few kilo's in Thailand because of beer every day.

Decided to have no beer in the house, not eat any carbs and stick to meat as far as possible. I did keto when Tim Noakes made it famous and went down to 90kg.

I want to lose 4 to 5 kgs before the end of the month, I am currently on 98kg.

I should really do some exercise as I enjoyed my early morning beach walks in Thailand.
 
when I turned 30ish, became a dad, work, wife, life you know how it goes I just got bigger and bigger.

Before I knew it I was 138 at 40 years old.

Got a kick up the ass from a mate who is a surgeon and he basically told me that in my current state I would be a severe risk even for a basic procedure.

Well I got to work changing my diet and lifestyle.

It’s been 13 months and I’m at 92. My perfect weight for my hight.

Losing weight after 40 is pure misery, but I feel great now.
 
when I turned 30ish, became a dad, work, wife, life you know how it goes I just got bigger and bigger.

Before I knew it I was 138 at 40 years old.

Got a kick up the ass from a mate who is a surgeon and he basically told me that in my current state I would be a severe risk even for a basic procedure.

Well I got to work changing my diet and lifestyle.

It’s been 13 months and I’m at 92. My perfect weight for my hight.

Losing weight after 40 is pure misery, but I feel great now.

Wow, you lost about 1/3rd of your body weight. Well done.
 
when I turned 30ish, became a dad, work, wife, life you know how it goes I just got bigger and bigger.

Before I knew it I was 138 at 40 years old.

Got a kick up the ass from a mate who is a surgeon and he basically told me that in my current state I would be a severe risk even for a basic procedure.

Well I got to work changing my diet and lifestyle.

It’s been 13 months and I’m at 92. My perfect weight for my hight.

Losing weight after 40 is pure misery, but I feel great now.

And here I am worried about being over 90 for the first time ever.
 
I am overweight according to that chart, I should be between 80 and 90.

I will make 90 my goal, I am turning 54 this year so it gets tougher and tougher.
 
Good to hear you've had success with your weight-loss diet. Have you thought of what you want your diet to look like once you get to 80kg?

Regular exercise is also an important factor, especially weight training. Our metabolisms don't actually start to change until we reach our 60s, what does happen though is that from our 30s on we begin to lose muscle mass as sarcopenia sets in. How much muscle mass you have has a big effect on how much energy you burn - more muscle, more calories you can take in without gaining weight and the easier it is to lose weight.

It's a consistent theme, quality of life in general remains far higher for people who keep up a regular exercise routine, it massively impacts general health outcomes and all-cause mortality. Feeling tired and sore in your 40s and 50s is not a given, it's something we allow to set in through inactivity and dietary choices.

Having said all that, I appreciate it's very difficult to get into any kind of fitness routine when you're not used to doing much at all. For myself, I find it easier to stay motivated by being part of a class of some sort. It keeps you on a schedule and you get to know other regulars, which then becomes its own little support group.

I don't think there's a one size fits all motivational tip though. My wife for example prefers training alone, in the summer she goes out to the water with her mat and kettle bell and trains there.

Overall I just want to keep feeling good for as long as I can, 40 may seem old to some, but we've got a long way to go yet!

Dope comment and I concur fully. Was 90kg when I started then dropped to 73 now up 85 (not jacked though)

I mainly focus on strength training (HIIT) then throw in some aerobics (also HIIT) , before covid I was a beast gyming at least 3X a week now due to winter and studies I do it at least once. I once had a shoulder impingement that made me bum for 2 months then I resumed, hardly get sick or feel body aches. Fatigue is more from studying and work.

The important thing is to never stop which a lot of ppl tend to do especially house couples and parents. Gyming is a mean bully that demands discipline no sweat no results. I lent my best friend some of my weights and bench a month ago and dude ghosts me whenever I ask him about progress, I only struggle with belly fat but its nothing compared to my peers. Exercise changes mindset too, I seldom buy takeaways, only social drink, quit vaping and only date slim girls.
 
Good to hear you've had success with your weight-loss diet. Have you thought of what you want your diet to look like once you get to 80kg?

Regular exercise is also an important factor, especially weight training. Our metabolisms don't actually start to change until we reach our 60s, what does happen though is that from our 30s on we begin to lose muscle mass as sarcopenia sets in. How much muscle mass you have has a big effect on how much energy you burn - more muscle, more calories you can take in without gaining weight and the easier it is to lose weight.

It's a consistent theme, quality of life in general remains far higher for people who keep up a regular exercise routine, it massively impacts general health outcomes and all-cause mortality. Feeling tired and sore in your 40s and 50s is not a given, it's something we allow to set in through inactivity and dietary choices.

Having said all that, I appreciate it's very difficult to get into any kind of fitness routine when you're not used to doing much at all. For myself, I find it easier to stay motivated by being part of a class of some sort. It keeps you on a schedule and you get to know other regulars, which then becomes its own little support group.

I don't think there's a one size fits all motivational tip though. My wife for example prefers training alone, in the summer she goes out to the water with her mat and kettle bell and trains there.

Overall I just want to keep feeling good for as long as I can, 40 may seem old to some, but we've got a long way to go yet!
Hats off to you for taking charge of your health journey and making such impressive changes. It's common for our bodies to react differently to food as we age, but your commitment to adapting is inspiring.

Choosing the Keto path was a bold move, and your progress from 96KG to 85KG is remarkable. Those initial weeks, battling cravings and relearning nutrition, show your dedication.

Even during vacation, your mindful approach is admirable. Gaining just 0.5KGs after enjoying treats demonstrates your balance.

Discipline is key in the Keto lifestyle, and you've shown it's worth it. Push on towards your 80KG goal – you've proven your strength.
 
So decided to take a break from Keto last few days. Neighbours had a party on Friday and had pizza and cake. Today I decided on a Five Guys burger and chips and some ice-cream afterwards.

Nothing major except it will likely take me 4 days to get back into Ketosis again as you can't really have cheat days on Keto. Still, nothing like some carbs to pick up the spirits every now and again.
 
How long have you been doing the keto thing? Bear in mind, despite its popular adoption, it's a drastic diet and not healthy to sustain for too long.

As someone that occasionally cut weight through keto, I remember the feeling of craving pastry and giving in to cheat days. It's very effective, but not sustainable over long stretches - and certainly not a good lifestyle choice.

Maybe it's time you start to transition to a sustainable long term diet - fruits, greens, nuts, oats, preferred protein sources in reasonable daily portions. It doesn't mean not eating burgers, chips and ice-cream - there's good nutrition in there too - just try to keep that sort of thing to the weekend.

EDIT: Consider starting the weight training you mentioned as well. Not only is it important to maintain your physical health, it's key in maintaining your mental faculties into old age as well.
 
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