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Review: The Sims 4 Tiny Living Stuff Pack (PC)

8

Great

The 16th stuff pack for The Sims 4 is here, and this one has a bit of a twist. Tiny Living follows the popular real-world trend of living in small homes and introduces several objects and gameplay features to accommodate this. Let’s dive in and see what the Tiny Living stuff pack has to offer.

Create-A-Sim

This pack features a series of casual, comfy-looking outfits, many of them knitted. Of course, when creating Tiny Living, the Sims team couldn’t have known that knitting would win the recent community vote. It will be interesting to see how the CAS items in that pack compare to the comfy knits of Tiny Living.

Also added with this stuff pack are four new hairstyles, including two curly ones. They’re all pretty cute, but my favourite is the braided one, which gives me strong Princess Leia vibes. What’s interesting is that, while kids and toddlers don’t get any new outfits in this pack, they do get all four adult hairstyles. This is a first – apparently it was a challenge for the team to get right – and last week’s patch also included a couple of existing adult hairstyles for younger Sims. I really hope this means that more adult hairstyles will be adapted in future.

Living Tiny

‘Tiny Living’ isn’t just a theme this pack was going for, unlike most other stuff packs. This pack actually introduces a new lot type, ‘Tiny Home Residential’, that actually counts the number of enclosed tiles on a lot, and gives the lot perks based on the number of tiles used. A ‘small’ home uses 100 or fewer tiles, a ‘tiny’ home is 64 or less, and a ‘micro’ home is only 32 tiles.

This tile counting mechanic creates a whole new level of challenge for Simmers. Small homes have always been a challenge enjoyed by the community, but having tangible gameplay benefits for a build of a certain size is a nice bonus. Micro homes earn the most perks, including smaller bills, faster relationship and skill gain, more comfort from objects, faster plant growth, and longer positive moodlets. Tiny and small homes only get some of these benefits, which may be preferable for some Simmers who feel that some of the boosts are a bit too powerful.

The tile counter only includes tiles that are enclosed within rooms, so I expect to see a lot of builds with rooftop spaces and expansive patio areas, but I’m really looking forward to seeing what the talented community of builders comes up with.

Buy Mode Stuff

Like any stuff pack, Tiny Living includes an array of new items to fill your Sims’ (tiny) homes with. Chief among these is the ‘Murphy bed’ (fold-down bed), which makes a return from previous Sims games. It comes in several variants, but they all feature a wall cabinet that hides a double bed that your Sims can lower to sleep on, and hide out of the way to make more room during the day. It’s an electronic item that is far from reliable, meaning your Sims may need to try to pull it down manually, often with hilarious – and sometimes deadly – results.

The rest of the items in the pack also focus around fitting into small spaces. This is nothing more than a visual effect in the case of some of the objects, like chairs and clutter items. However, there are a few objects that do actually save some space, like the new TV stands that combine a TV, bookshelf and soundbar, and the functions of all of those items. These will be useful in all sorts of homes, not just especially tiny ones.

The styles and colour swatches for the new furniture work really well together, and include several plain colour options as well as fun blue or orange styles.

I was sceptical when this pack was first announced, but I was pleasantly surprised by Tiny Living. Trying to fit a functioning home into 32 squares, or even 64 or 100, is a real challenge. The gameplay benefits that are included to encourage living in a smaller space are a really nice bonus as well. The new items and outfits are high quality and I can see myself using them in the future.

This review was made possible by EA Game Changers. Check out the official trailer below:

Good

  • Great new furniture options
  • Tangible gameplay benefits for living in a tiny home
  • Fun building challenge

Bad

  • No clothing for kids or toddlers

Summary

Tiny Living is a pleasantly surprising stuff pack, with a host of new objects to spruce up any Sim home. Building smaller homes is a challenge that provides welcome gameplay benefits for the Sims who choose to live in them.
8

Great

Gamer, geek, LEGO fanatic. I also love Pathfinder RPG, The Sims, cross stitching, crochet, and sci-fi and fantasy movies, games & books. And animals.

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